The Search for a Proportional Font for Developers

Posted by: Roland Weigelt, on 14 Jun 2016 | View original | Bookmarked: 0 time(s)

Fonts for text editors and IDEs are often monospaced, i.e. non-proportional, by default. This may seem like an obvious choice – after all, how else do you line up characters horizontally? The disadvantage of a monospaced font is that text lines can become relatively wide, because by definition, all characters have to have the same width as the character that requires the most space (the uppercase “W”). Back in the 80ies and early 90ies, with identifier names like “strnicmp()”,...

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