Did You Know That... You can create vertical or horizontal linear gradients?

Posted by: Jesse Liberty - Silverlight Geek, on 18 Jan 2008 | View original | Bookmarked: 0 time(s)

By default, linear gradients are on a diagonal.  Understanding this begins with the implicit assumption of a coordinate system superimposed on every shape in which the upper-left hand corner is set to 0,0, with the x axis extending to 1 at the right edge of the shape, and the y axis set to 1 at the bottom of the shape. An implicit diagonal is then superimposed from 0,0 to 1,1, and the colors are placed at GradientStops along that diagonal. The LinearGradientBrush blends the colors evenly...

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